House of Charity Names Deborah F. Moses CEO/Executive Director

The House of Charity Board of Directors has named experienced nonprofit leader Deborah F. Moses, DPA, MPH, as the new Chief Executive Officer and Executive Director of the agency whose mission is to feed those in need, house those experiencing homelessness, and empower individuals to achieve independence. Moses will assume the leadership post effective December 10, 2018.

“For nearly 30 years, Deb Moses has worked within communities experiencing poverty and a vast array of disparities,” stated Wendy Wehr, president of the House of Charity board of directors. “She is a proven leader in creating systems that allow individuals and families to reach their full potential.”

Moses has served in numerous executive leadership positions at nonprofit social service agencies, as well as in key posts with the Minnesota Department of Human Services, where she managed large programs and shaped public policy. She has overseen budgets up to $110 million, has actively raised program and capital revenue, has improved service delivery, and has managed multiple programs and facilities within complex regulatory environments.

Moses holds a doctorate in public administration from Hamline University and graduated from the University of Minnesota with a master’s degree in public health. In addition, she has a chemical dependency counseling certificate and advanced credentials in health service administration. She also serves as adjunct faculty at Metro State University in the Co-Occurring Disorders Master’s Program and at St. Mary’s University in the School of Public Health.

Moses is a lifelong resident of the Twin Cities, currently residing in south Minneapolis. She has three adult children and two grandchildren who are the joys of her life. She enjoys bike riding throughout the Cities, hot yoga, reading, knitting, and traveling.

Two Minutes With…Michael Bennett, Director of Volunteer & Outreach Services

 

Mike has worked at House of Charity for over 10 years. His current title is Outreach and Volunteer Director, but he started as the Food Service Manager. Over the course of a decade, faces and programs have changed, but the need for assistance, sadly, is stronger than ever. “Ultimately, the goal of any agency which provides basic needs is to hang a sign that reads ‘closed, due to lack of customers’” Mike states.“If that sign were to be hung here, that would mean we don’t have people who need food, housing, or treatment. Sadly, we haven’t hung that sign in the ten years I have been here, nor the sixty years we have been an agency.”

When looking at ten years with one agency, the question of what keeps you coming back isn’t uncommon. “For me, it’s the tangibility.” Mike answered. “Take the Food Centre for example, you can look at the meal count and see that 422 people ate lunch today because of House of Charity. That food was made here and served here. For all we know, that was the only meal that someone will eat all day. And the same concept applies to Housing and Treatment too.”

While he has run the Food Centre in the past, Mike’s primary job function now is to be a voice in the community as to how House of Charity provides assistance to those in need. “I do a lot of presentations at businesses, civic groups, churches, and to our volunteers. I do my best to present realism to our stakeholders, and explain that the issues of homelessness, hunger, and need are as strong here in Minnesota as they are in Chicago or New York. The majority of us don’t want to acknowledge how close we are to needing assistance. But, it is hard for me to ignore reality when someone explains that they have only $80 for the month to buy food and personal items. They aren’t a composite story on the news. That person is here, in front of us as staff, and I try my best to relay that story to the groups I meet.”

At the end of his presentations, Mike uses a common closing; “I suggest, if nothing else, to say hello to people. By acknowledging someone’s humanity, simply saying hello, you may time stamp their week. For many of the people we serve, today feels a lot like last Tuesday. It may not seem like much, but the fact that a person didn’t walk past them as if they were a parking meter or a trash can might make their day, week or even longer. It’s really quite simple to do.”

Mike finishes by mentioning a meeting he was at a few months back. “We were asked what our legacy would be. As in, if we never came back to our position, what would we be remembered for? I hope mine would be that everyone matters. I give as much effort in getting to know someone in the meal line as I would to a CEO of a major corporation. I encourage everyone I meet to do the same. When a long-time volunteer asks ‘what happened to Bill, Eric, or Jane’ I know we are doing something right at HOC. One of our guests or our clients mattered enough for that volunteer to remember them, and ask about them. A connection was made. Often in our lives, we forget that we can positively impact people with our actions. It is pretty rewarding to see those positive interactions take place here every day.”

Two Minutes With…Board Member, Dustin Chapman

Board Member Dustin Chapman

 

This November, at their annual meeting, the Board of Directors recognized outgoing Board member Dustin Chapman’s six years of service to House of Charity.  Dustin, who is currently Behavioral Services Liaison with Fairview, was recruited to the Board because of his knowledge and experience in chemical dependency treatment programs.  Dustin started out with Fairview twenty-eight years ago as clinical supervisor of an inpatient chemical dependency unit.  His current role involves community outreach, licensing and regulatory compliance, and public policy. Dustin monitors legislation to keep Fairview informed of laws that may affect how they deliver services.  He is working with other community groups to monitor the impact of health care reform on chemical dependency programs.  In addition to his commitment to House of Charity, Dustin chairs the Board of Directors of Minnesota Recovery Connection, which advocates on behalf of the recovery community and provides recovery coaching.  He also serves on the board of Minnesota Association of Resources for Recovery and Health.

Because of his expertise, Dustin has been an invaluable resource for House of Charity’s Day by Day program.  At the beginning of his tenure, Dustin suggested we move in the direction of changing our Day by Day program from a halfway house for recovery to an outpatient chemical dependency treatment program.  In the past year, he has provided insight into the timing and anticipated results of funding changes for our expanded chemical dependency and mental health treatment program.  House of Charity’s Board of Directors and staff are grateful for Dustin’s passion for the program and his significant contributions to the growth of the agency.