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A Look at Hunger in Our Neighborhood

As one of our generous supporters, you affect the lives of the more than 350 people who visit our Food Centre every day. We depend upon you to serve the hungry in the Minneapolis area.

Despite the improved economy, hunger and the need for meals every day has increased. We have served almost 2000 more people so far this year than we did in 2014. Thirty-nine percent of the 6,769 individuals served so far in 2015 said the lunch provided by House of Charity’s Food Centre was their only meal of the day.

Through a continuing partnership with Second Harvest Heartland, a Minneapolis-based food bank, just 50¢ provides a hot nutritious meal for an individual through our Food Centre.

Tanks to your support, we make sure everyone who comes to the Food Centre receives the nourishment they need.

HOC graphic, meals per day

Article from our Fall “Beats” Newsletter

House of Charity Heart, to give, contribute, feed, house, empower with a heart of charity

Wells Fargo Food Center Volunteer Profile

Several years ago, Kip was introduced to the House of Charity Food Centre through a volunteer opportunity with his employer, Wells Fargo. The experience volunteering at House of Charity, combined with Kip’s long-time passion for giving back to the community, led him to build a team of his colleagues to begin serving on a monthly basis.

 

Kip was drawn to the organization because, in his words, “They have their doors wide open” to the public.  Additionally, one reason Kip has continued volunteering at the Food Centre is the structure. He states, “It gives people a good meal and a safe place to eat it.” In his interactions with the people at the Food Centre, Kip explains that recipients of meals are always very polite and appreciative.

 

Kip also explained that as volunteers, “you are ambassadors to the organization.” He challenges volunteers to get to know the other volunteers with whom they serve and to develop a sense of community. Kip explains, “As volunteers, we get as much out of the experience of serving, as we put into it.”

Instilling Hope One to Another

A Compilation of Stories & Experiences from Food Centre Guests

CJ: When CJ first came to the Food Centre she was homeless and looking for community resources. CJ knew that she needed to do something positive to get out of the lifestyle she was in, so she started school at MCTC and began volunteering at the Food Centre. CJ does anything and everything at the Food Centre, from greeting people to cleaning up, but she especially enjoys talking with others, “I just want to make the people who come here feel welcome and have hope in their lives.” CJ also makes sure that children and the disabled get their meals. Now, CJ is still in school, majoring in Addiction Counseling, has her own apartment, and volunteers and eats at the Food Centre on a regular basis. She is very appreciative of the support she has received from the Food Centre staff and hopes to further her involvement with House of Charity, perhaps as a Day by Day treatment program intern.

Daisy Rose: “Sounds like Love,” Daisy Rose says about the Food Centre. Sometimes the meal at the Food Centre is her only meal that day. “I’m comfortable with the amount of food and very thankful.” Daisy Rose was a nurse for 19 years, but her MS symptoms worsened and she could no longer work. When she lost her job in 2011, Daisy Rose spent her 401K on living and medical expenses. In addition to dining with us, she volunteers her time at the Food Centre; she likes everyone, knows people, and says it’s consistent with her upbringing: “we all work together.” She’s one of the regulars who helps Walter, a paraplegic guest, to eat lunch and notes that she is very grateful for House of Charity.

The Tiger Family- Julie, Nate, Daniel, & Baby: When Nate lost his job last spring in Duluth, the family was devastated financially and they quickly lost their apartment. They came to Burnsville to stay with family, but that was an alcoholic and abusive place where people directed their anger towards four year old Daniel. So, the family camped out this summer, in their van and area parks. They’ve had to resort to Nate staying at a men’s shelter while Julie and the kids live at a family shelter to save money and find jobs. Daniel likes the meat and cheeses at the Food Centre and most of all he loves meeting his friend Claire at the weekend brunch. Julie commented, “It’s great to be with other people who’ve been humbled by the world.” Julie is hopeful that by winter, both she and Nate will have jobs and a place to call home.

Two Minutes With…Board Member, Dustin Chapman

Board Member Dustin Chapman

 

This November, at their annual meeting, the Board of Directors recognized outgoing Board member Dustin Chapman’s six years of service to House of Charity.  Dustin, who is currently Behavioral Services Liaison with Fairview, was recruited to the Board because of his knowledge and experience in chemical dependency treatment programs.  Dustin started out with Fairview twenty-eight years ago as clinical supervisor of an inpatient chemical dependency unit.  His current role involves community outreach, licensing and regulatory compliance, and public policy. Dustin monitors legislation to keep Fairview informed of laws that may affect how they deliver services.  He is working with other community groups to monitor the impact of health care reform on chemical dependency programs.  In addition to his commitment to House of Charity, Dustin chairs the Board of Directors of Minnesota Recovery Connection, which advocates on behalf of the recovery community and provides recovery coaching.  He also serves on the board of Minnesota Association of Resources for Recovery and Health.

Because of his expertise, Dustin has been an invaluable resource for House of Charity’s Day by Day program.  At the beginning of his tenure, Dustin suggested we move in the direction of changing our Day by Day program from a halfway house for recovery to an outpatient chemical dependency treatment program.  In the past year, he has provided insight into the timing and anticipated results of funding changes for our expanded chemical dependency and mental health treatment program.  House of Charity’s Board of Directors and staff are grateful for Dustin’s passion for the program and his significant contributions to the growth of the agency.